Bonus List

PROHIBITION LIVES: LARGEST U.S. COUNTIES TO BE "DRY COUNTIES"

A substantial number of counties in the U.S., mostly from Texas to Virginia, are still dry (meaning that no alcohol can be sold--either in stores, restaurants or bars, though sometimes technicalities will allow for private "members-only" clubs). Most dry counties are rural, but some have surprisingly high populations.

A number of other counties partially restrict alcohol sales (like no alcohol sold in stores, but restaurants can sell it). Also, some cities within counties have partial or total bans (for example, Lubbock, Texas, is the largest city to have no liquor sold in stores, yet bars exist), and some counties would be dry except for a city that has an exception (like Sevier County, Tennessee is dry except for Gatlinburg). Confusing? Quite often yes.

#1 is Smith County, in eastern Texas, containing the city of Tyler. The headquarters of Walmart (Bentonville, Arkansas) is in county #2, and the #3 county contains some very conservative suburbs of Jackson, Mississippi. In fact, all 10 of these counties had more votes for Bush than Kerry (with the Bush votes ranging from 54% in Montgomery County, Virginia to an utterly extreme 79% in Rankin County, Mississippi).


COUNTY, STATE
1. Smith, Texas
2. Benton, Arkansas
3. Rankin, Mississippi
4. Faulkner, Arkansas
5. Saline, Arkansas
6. Bowie, Texas
7. Montgomery, Virginia
8. Angelina, Texas
9. Cullman, Alabama
10. White, Arkansas

POPULATION (2005)
190,594
186,938
131,841
97,147
91,188
90,643
84,303
81,557
79,886
71,332


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Copyright 2006 Brandt Maxwell.