Bonus List

U.S. STATES WHERE ALL OF THE RIVERS AND STREAMS SHARE ONLY ONE OUTLET TO THE OCEAN

Most states have multiple hydrological outlets to the ocean (for example, New York has outlets to the ocean via the St. Lawrence River, the Hudson River, the Mississippi River (for a small part of southwestern New York), a couple of small rivers and streams that flow mostly through Connecticut and numerous streams on Long Island). In contrast, several states in the central United States and the Ohio/Tennessee Valley region have all of their rivers and streams draining towards the Mississippi Delta. Also, Idaho has all of its rivers and streams draining towards the Columbia River, except for a small part of southeastern Idaho which is a part of the internally-drained (no outlet to the ocean) Great Basin (so it'll technically count here).

Two states almost appear on this list: Michigan and Tennessee. In Michigan, in the upper peninsula, a few square miles of land drain into Lac Vieux Desert (a lake that straddles the Wisconsin-Michigan border), and that drains into the Wisconsin River which drains into the Mississippi River which dumps into the Gulf of Mexico through its large delta. The rest of the state (like all of the Great Lakes) drains towards the St. Lawrence River. In Tennessee, all of the states drains towards the Mississippi River except a few square miles near the Georgia border which contain the Conasauga River, which via the Coosa, Alabama and Mobile Rivers (or the Tensaw River split) drains into the Gulf of Mexico at Mobile Bay.

1. Arkansas
2. Idaho
3. Iowa
4. Kansas
5. Kentucky
6. Missouri
7. Nebraska
8. Oklahoma

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Copyright 2005 Brandt Maxwell.